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CSA News: Week 14- August 26 to August 28

This Week’s Share…Share Photo Coming Soon

Crop

Family Share

Half Share

Corn, Sugar Pearl 8 ears 4 ears
Cucumbers 2 each 1 each
Eggplant 4 each 2 each
Fennel (with tops)
2 bulbs 1 bulb
Leeks 4 each 2 each
Peppers, Green Bell 4 each 2 each
Summer Squash on rotation on rotation
Tomatoes, Slicing 4 pounds 2 pounds

Share Notes

  • Corn: Enjoy this week’s large ears  of Sugar Pearl, a white kernel variety that is terrifically sweet and fruity.
  • Cucumbers: Sliced, diced, or whole, it’s the last week for enjoying this fresh summer crop.

It’s canning time! Order Bulk Tomatoes from SIO

After several seasons of requests, we finally got our tomato growing act together to offer our CSA membership the opportunity to buy tomatoes in bulk for putting up.We will be offering 20lb flats of our slicing tomatoes for pick-up at the farm only, and will be setting up orders for pick-up this coming weekend (Aug. 29-31) and the following weekend (Sept. 5-7). The New Girl variety that we grow is great for slow roasting and freezing, or canning up as crushed tomatoes. They are are great for making big batches of salsa and tomato sauce.

  • $35 for 20lb flat of Red Slicing Tomatoes

To pick-up your order this weekend at the farm please order by 12pm (noon) Thursday 8/28. All orders will be available for pick-up at the farm 12pm (Noon) Friday 8/29 through 5pm Sunday 8/31. To place an order email the farm at csa@sauvieislandorganics.com with your name, number of 20lb flats you’d like, and the weekend you want them available for pick-up at the farm (either this weekend 8/29-8/31, or next weekend 9/5-9/7). You will receive an email confirming your order and directions for how to pick-up from the farm. Please invite your non-CSA member friends, neighbors, and co-workers to take advantage of this opportunity and get in on some of the SIO bounty as well.

 

 

 

Comments

Recipes for CSA Week 14

I’ll begin the week’s note but talking about last week’s celery. I still have plenty and luckily it keeps well so I’ve included a few recipes that I turned to thanks to the celery, including poaching a whole chicken. It served me well all last week. Plenty of other quick and easy things to do with the tomatoes and eggplant and a corn chowder recipe that uses this week’s green peppers as well. Happy cooking!

Poaching a Chicken (for Chicken Salad with lots of Celery, etc.)
Eggplant and Summer Squash Green Curry
Corn, Cucumber Salad with Buttermilk Dressing
Corn Chowder with Leeks and Green Pepper
Simplest Tomato Sauce and its Many Uses
Pasta with Eggplant and Tomato
Fennel and Onion Soffrito

Poaching a Whole Chicken

When you poach a chicken, you’re doing two things: You’re making a delicious poached chicken, and you’re making a savory chicken broth that you can use in many ways.

The reason I’m including this recipe in the packet this week is that I was inspired to poach a chicken last week because of all the celery. You use it to poach and in many of the recipes you might make to use the cooked chicken—chicken salad, chicken noodle soup, etc.

poaching chicken

  • Rinse the chicken and giblets/neck (if there were any) under cold running water and shake off any water.
  • Put the chicken in a large pot with ½ an onion, chopped up a bit, 2 carrots, quartered, 3-4 stalks celery and any attached celery leaves, chopped up a bit.
  • Add 2 teaspoons whole peppercorns; a clove of garlic (peeled and crushed); 2-3 bay leaves and a sprig or two of thyme and parsley if you have them.
  • Cover the chicken with water, add 2 teaspoons sea or Kosher salt and bring to a boil. Then lower to a simmer, cover and cook for about an hour and 10 minutes.
  • If you’re making soup, after about an hour, you can add some diced potatoes, turnips, peeled and diced, etc.
  • After the full hour and 10 minutes, turn off the heat, remove the chicken and transfer it to pan or a rimmed baking sheet to cool for about twenty minutes. Check to see if the chicken is fully cooked and the meat comes off of the bones easily and the juices run clear. Strain and use broth immediately for soup or strain into quart or pint jars and refrigerate or freeze for future use. Use it for soup, risotto, sauces, etc.
  • When the chicken is cool enough to handle pull off all the meat. The juicy poached chicken meat is wonderful in chicken noodle soup, chicken salad, enchiladas, moles, curries (like the one below) tacos, chicken pot pie, pasta dishes, etc.
  • Alternately, you could let the poached chicken cool for about five minutes and then just pull it apart into the main eight pieces (two each of breast, thigh, drumstick and wing) and serve with the broth and vegetables.

Green Curry with Eggplant and Summer Squash

I have made variations of this Thai-inspired curry for 15 years. It is not an authentic green curry but a tasty, quick adaptation. You can easily add chicken (if you poached a chicken—see above—this is a great place for some of the meat) or tofu to it for an even heartier dish though it’s wonderfully rich and satisfying without as well.

The curry is even better if you have kaffir lime leaves–Whole Foods and New Seasons and many Asian grocery stores typically have them. They freeze perfectly so if you see some but plenty and freeze for future curries. But don’t worry if you don’t have any.

green bean eggplant green curry

This version has green beans rather than summer squash in it but is otherwise identical.

Serves 4 (generously)

About 2 cups summer squash, cut into half-rounds or ½-inch dice
1 medium Japanese eggplant or smallish globe eggplant, halved and sliced into half rounds or diced
3-4 kaffir lime leaves (optional–see headnote)
1 – 2 inch piece of ginger, peeled and minced
2 cloves of garlic, minced
1 1/2 heaping teaspoon (or to taste) green curry paste (Thai & True is a great local Oregon brand)
2 teaspoons soy sauce
2-3 teaspoons fish sauce (can omit to make it vegetarian/vegan)
1 can coconut milk (full fat preferably but light will work too)
3 tablespoons basil, packed and roughly chopped
Salt to taste
Juice of half a lemon or lime (optional but excellent especially if you don’t have kaffir lime leaves)

White or brown cooked Jasmine or other long grain rice

Heat wok or large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add ½ cup of coconut milk (use the thickest, part usually at the top of the can) and bring to a simmer. Stir occasionally for 2-3 minutes. Add the curry paste, garlic and ginger and fry it for about 3-4 minutes until it’s fragrant. Then add the remainder of the coconut milk plus ½ can’s worth of water, lime leaves, if using, soy sauce and fish sauce. Bring to a boil and then turn down to a simmer and add the eggplant and squash and simmer for about 10-15 minutes until the vegetables are tender. Add the basil and cook for another minute or two. Adjust seasoning with a bit of salt or more soy sauce and/or fish sauce or salt if needed and finish with a generous squeeze of lime or lemon juice, if using. Serve hot over rice.

Corn, Cucumber Salad with Buttermilk Dressing

This is a cook-with-what-you-have salad—add leftover diced celery if you have it or whatever else you want/need to use up. You can add 2 cups of thinly sliced lettuce to lighten up this salad if you’d like but it’d good as a denser salad too. The dressing will be more than you need for this salad but it’s a great on boiled potatoes or other vegetables or salads.

Serves 4-5

Corn kernels from 3-4 ears of cooked corn, cut off with a sharp knife
2 cups cucumber, well-scrubbed but no need to peel, cut into small dice (deseed them if you are going to need to let the salad sit for a while–it will get watery if it sits and you leave the seeds in)
1/3-½ cup of diced sweet or torpedo onion
½ cup diced or thinly sliced fennel
A little diced green pepper (optional)
2 cups, thinly sliced lettuce (optional –see headnote)
Couple of tablespoons chopped fennel fronds

Dressing:

1/4 cup buttermilk (or heavy cream or just use a bit more yogurt but you’ll need to thin it with more oil or a little water if you just use yogurt as it will be pretty thick)
1/2 cup Greek or plain whole milk yogurt
1 tablespoon white-wine vinegar or lemon juice (or more to taste)
1 small clove garlic, minced and mashed with a pinch of salt
2 tablespoons good-tasting olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
3 tablespoons chopped parsley or 1½ tablespoons chopped dill or parsley (optional)

Mix the dressing in a small bowl until emulsified. Toss the vegetables with the dressing and serve with wedges of hardboiled eggs and some boiled new potatoes for a light supper.

Corn Chowder with Leeks and Green Pepper

I love corn chowder, with or without bacon. This week’s green peppers will make for a beautiful and delicious chowder.

2 tablespoons olive oil
½ onion, finely diced
1-2 leeks, trimmed (though I use a fair amount of the green parts) washed well, halved lengthwise and cut into ½-inch half rounds
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 slices bacon, diced (optional) or 1 teaspoon smoked Spanish paprika (pimenton)
1 teaspoon fresh thyme or dried thyme (optional but very good)
1 large or 2 small green peppers, seeds and membranes removed and diced
Kernels from 4 ears of corn (or more if you have it), sliced off the cob
2 cups (or more) potatoes, well scrubbed but not peeled and cut into 1/2 –inch dice
3 cups whole milk (or part milk, part cream)
3 cups homemade veggie bouillon broth (if you have it) or stock or broth of your choice
Salt and freshly ground pepper
A little chopped parsley or basil (optional) for serving
Drizzle of good olive oil

Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy pot over medium high heat. Add the onions and leeks and bacon (if using) and thyme (if using) and sauté for about 5 minutes. If you’re not using bacon and have smoked Spanish paprika (pimenton) add a teaspoon of it at this stage. Add the garlic and the peppers and cook for another 5 minutes. Add the potatoes and all the milk (or milk and cream) and stock or broth. Add salt if your stock is not very salty. Bring to a boil and let simmer briskly for about 8 minutes. Add the corn and cook for another 10 – 15 minutes until everything is tender. The potatoes should be falling apart and will help thicken the chowder. Taste and adjust seasoning. Serve with chopped parsley (if you have it) and a good drizzle of olive oil.

Simplest Tomato Sauce and its Many Uses

simple tomato sauce copy

Tomatoes, olive oil, salt. That’s it. When the tomatoes are good it’s honestly all you need. And I make sauce with slicer and heirloom tomatoes all the time. It takes longer to cook down because they’re so juicy but with a little patience and high heat it’s perfect. You can of course add a diced onion or a clove or two of garlic and it will be wonderful but it’s also good just as is. And you can blanch the tomatoes—toss the whole tomatoes in boiling water for 10 seconds, remove peel and proceed—or skip that step.

I made this the other day, in about 15 minutes and I topped pizza dough with it and some mozzarella and basil and had the perfect dinner. 

Dice as many tomatoes as you want to use. Add them to a wide skillet to which you’ve added a generous splash of olive oil. Cook at a lively simmer until it’s thickened to your liking. Salt to taste. If the sauce seems too acidic or not quite perfect add a tablespoon or two of butter. Butter is THE perfecter of tomato sauce. 

More suggestions for use:

  • Fill crepes with a few tablespoons, some grated cheese and fresh basil; roll up and bake, topped with a bit more sauce, until hot.
  • Layer the sauce with thick, eggy herb crepes (add 4-5 tablespoons of chopped parsley, chives and/or basil to the crepe batter of 4 eggs, 1 3/4 cups milk and scant 1 cup of flour, salt and pepper) and grated Parmesan or other cheese. Layer the crepes and sauce in a cake pan or other round or oval dish and bake until heated through and the cheese is melted and browning on top. This is a perfectly sublime dish and beautiful cut into wedges.
  • Make eggplant parmesan by layering pan-fried or broiled slices of eggplant with the sauce and grated parmesan and baking until bubbly and browning.

Pasta with Eggplant and Tomato

This is a quick, hearty pasta dish.

eggplant tomato sauce

pasta w: eggplant tomatoe sauce

Olive oil
1 medium globe eggplant or several smaller ones, cut into ½ -inch dice (no need to peel, salt or soak)
2-3 medium tomatoes, diced (depending how saucy/tomato-y you want it)
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon capers, rinsed and roughly chopped (optional)
2-3 tablespoons chopped parsley (or basil or a combination)
½ cup grated Parmesan or other hard cheese
3/4 lb fusilli, penne or other stout pasta
1/3 cup pasta cooking water, reserved before draining

Sauté the eggplant in a heavy skillet with 2 tablespoons of olive oil over high, then medium-high heat stirring frequently. When the eggplant is soft, add the tomatoes, capers, if using, and the garlic and several generous pinches of salt. Cook on high heat until the tomatoes break down just a bit and some of their liquid evaporates so you have a nice thick, chunky sauce—about 10 minutes. Add the parsley and/or basil.

Meanwhile cook the pasta in plenty of salted, boiling water until al dente. Right before you drain the pasta scoop out about ½ cup of pasta cooking water. Drain the pasta, toss with the sauce, add the reserved cooking water to loosen it up a bit and serve immediately with the cheese.

Fennel and Onion Soffrito

fennel and onion soffrito

This is a delicious garnish/condiment/side for fish, roasted vegetables, or simply on toast. 

Olive oil
1 ½ cups thinly sliced fennel (or more—you can use a lot of fennel in this dish, just add a bit more tomato)
1 ½ cups thinly sliced onion
1 cup diced tomatoes (or more if you’re using more fennel)
2 cloves garlic
Red wine vinegar to taste
Salt and pepper
Chopped parsley (optional but very good)

In the largest skillet you have heat about 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Add the onions and fennel all at once and cook, stirring occasionally over medium heat until starting to brown and quite soft. Add the garlic and the tomatoes, a couple of generous pinches of salt and some pepper and cook until the liquid has evaporated. Finally add a little vinegar, you’ll probably want at least 2 teaspoons and plenty of black pepper. Taste and adjust seasoning.

This is delicious with a bunch of chopped parsley and black olives too. 

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CSA News: Week 13- August 19 to August 21

This Week’s Share

Crop

Family Share

Half Share

Celery 2 heads 1 head
Corn, Sugarbuns 8 each (6 for Wed sites) 4 each (3 for Wed sites)
Cucumbers 2 each 1 each
Eggplant 6 Japanese or 2 Italian 3 Japanese or 1 Italian
Lettuce 2 heads 1 head
Onions, Red Long of Tropea 2 each 1 each
Peppers, Poblano 4 each 2 each
Summer Squash on rotation on rotation
Tomatoes, Slicing 2 pounds 1 pound

Share Notes

  • Celery: It’s big and beautiful once again, and this will be the last time in the share for the season so use it in all your favorite ways.
  • Corn: Everyone is getting Sugar Buns corn in their share this week! This variety is know to have a smaller ear, with a delicate but not overwhelming sweetness.
  • Peppers, Poblano: In general these peppers are relatively mild, but from time to time they take on some heat even in the green stage, so it’s always best to give a taste first.

It’s canning time! Order Bulk Tomatoes from SIO

After several seasons of requests, we finally got our tomato growing act together to offer our CSA membership the opportunity to buy tomatoes in bulk for putting up. We will be offering 20lb flats of our slicing tomatoes for pick-up at the farm only, and will be setting up orders for pick-up this coming weekend (Aug. 22-24) and the following weekend (Aug. 29-31). The New Girl variety that we grow is great for slow roasting and freezing, or canning up as crushed tomatoes. They are are great for making big batches of salsa and tomato sauce.

  • $35 for 20lb flat of Red Slicing Tomatoes

To pick-up your order this weekend at the farm please order by 12pm (noon) Thursday 8/21. All orders will be available for pick-up at the farm 12pm (Noon) Friday 8/22 through 5pm Sunday 8/24. To place an order email the farm at csa@sauvieislandorganics.com with your name, number of 20lb flats you’d like, and the weekend you want them available for pick-up at the farm (either this weekend 8/22-8/24, or next weekend 8/29-8/31). You will receive an email confirming your order and directions for how to pick-up from the farm. Please invite your non-CSA member friends, neighbors, and co-workers to take advantage of this opportunity and get in on some of the SIO bounty as well.

 

Comments

Recipes for CSA Week 13

More hot weather and more, more or less quick dishes this week. The gazpacho should be a welcome, refreshing dish on these hot nights. I finally just made a batch of Veggie Bouillon with my leftover celery yesterday (and carrots and leeks from the share) so if you still have them lying around, take advantage. The poblano and corn pizza is delicious as is the slightly unusual German, braised cucumber dish I included last year as well and got rave reviews from some of you. And alas this week I’m really lacking in photos but I’ll try to add some throughout the week.

Happy Cooking!

Hot and Sour Eggplant
Gazpacho
Sautéed Celery with Tomatoes and Parsley
Homemade Veggie Bouillon
Quick Veggie “Bolognese” Sauce
Schmorgurken (German Braised Cucumbers)
Poblano Notes
Corn, Poblano and Feta Pizza

Hot and Sour Eggplant

sweet sour hot eggplant

This is quick and delicious. Serve this over rice and if you have time make the baked brown rice below. It’s converted the most ardent brown-rice haters.

2 large eggplant or several smaller ones, cubed (skin on)
1 medium Torpedo onion, diced
1 sweet red pepper (optional), diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes, or fresh, minced jalapeno or other hot pepper
2 teaspoons cornstarch
2 teaspoons salt (or to taste)
3-4 tablespoons olive or sunflower or other oil

Stir together soy sauce, vinegar, red pepper flakes (or minced hot pepper), and cornstarch in a small bowel.

In a large skillet or work heat the oil and sauté onions and pepper (if using) over medium-high heat for about 5-7 minutes until they soften. Add eggplant and cook until softens and browns a bit, about 15 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the sauce and sir well to mix and coat veggies. Cook over medium heat for a few minutes until sauce thickens and veggies are tender.

Serve hot over rice.

Baked Brown Rice
–from Alton Brown

I often make a double batch and freeze the other half.

1 1/2 cups brown rice, medium or short grain
2 1/2 cups water
1 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon sea salt
Directions

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Place the rice into an 8-inch square glass baking dish.

Bring the water, butter, and salt just to a boil in a kettle or covered saucepan. Once the water boils, pour it over the rice, stir to combine, and cover the dish tightly with heavy-duty aluminum foil. Bake on the middle rack of the oven for 1 hour.

After 1 hour, remove cover and fluff the rice with a fork. Serve immediately.

Gazpacho

There are many versions of this classic Spanish soup, served cold or at room temperature (when it was first made, before refrigeration) and most include tomatoes, cucumbers, stale bread, a bit of sweet pepper and olive oil and wine vinegar. You can play with the ratio based on what you have and/or your tastes. I’ve written it to include a poblano pepper here for a twist on the classic (and a little ground cumin) to take advantage of what you have this week.

gazpacho w:poblano

Serves 4

1.5 – 2 lbs ripe, juicy tomatoes (about 4 medium)
1 small-to medium cucumber, peeled
1 poblano pepper, broiled until the skin is blistered and black and peeled and deseeded
About 2 tablespoons chopped Torpedo onion (optional)
1-2 slices good, day old crusty bread (crusts removed) (if you want a thinner soup use the smaller quantity)
1/4 cup good olive oil
2 tablespoons red wine or sherry vinegar
1 clove garlic, chopped
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1 cup water
Salt

If you have the time, bring a small pot of water to a boil and dunk the tomatoes in the boiling water for few seconds. Remove and peel the tomatoes. The skin should slip right off. You can omit this step and the soup will be fine.

Put all the ingredients in a food processor and process for a few seconds. You can leave it a bit chunky or puree it until quite smooth. I prefer a bit of texture. Taste and adjust seasoning.  Refrigerate briefly. I prefer mine not too cold but chill as you please.

Garnish with a drizzle of good olive oil and/or finely minced red onion, sweet pepper or cucumber (or any combination of them) or toasted bread crumbs.

Sautéed Celery with Tomatoes and Parsley
–adapted from Cooking From an Italian Garden by Paola Scaravelli & Jon Cohen

This is a fun side dish–the combination of the cooked celery and the parsley both stewed and fresh at the end is delicious. It’s good with a frittata or even over pasta or quinoa or some such. You can easily halve this dish too and save some of the celery for the pasta sauce, etc.

1 medium bunch celery, trimmed and cut into 1-2-inch pieces (reserve leaves for soups, salads, etc.) (I wrote this recipe before I saw the size of the celery bunches so I would use about 8 stalks or so)
1 tablespoon olive oil
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 ½ cups diced tomatoes
3 tablespoons parsley, chopped
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Grated Parmesan, for serving (optional)

Steam celery for 5-7 minutes, until just tender when pierced with a knife. Remove from the heat and drain.

In a large, heavy skillet heat the oil over medium-high heat and add the garlic and cook, stirring often, until it’s  fragrant, about 30 seconds and then add the  tomatoes, 2 tablespoons of the parsley and salt and pepper. Stir together, then stir in the celery. Cook, stirring often, until the tomatoes have cooked down and the mixture is reduced and thickened, about 10 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Serve with the remaining parsley and scattering of grated Parmesan if you’d like.

Quick Veggie “Bolognese” Sauce

It really makes no sense to name a sauce in this way since Bolognese connotes ground pork and beef but somehow the classic sofritto that is the foundation of a good Bolognese is the star of the show here. And of course you can add the meat if you’d like and make it “real”. Assuming you have a couple of carrots leftover you can make this. . . .

Olive oil
2-3 medium carrots scrubbed and finely diced
1 Torpedo onion, finely diced
3 stalks celery and a handful of celery leaves, finely chopped
Sea salt
1 clove garlic, minced
½ cup dry white or red wine (optional)
6 cups diced tomatoes (blanched and peeled if you’re feeling ambitious though it really is a cinch to dunk tomatoes in boiling water for a few seconds and then peel them)

Heat about 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large, heavy skillet. When hot add the onion, carrot and celery and a few pinches salt. Saute over medium-high heat, stirring often. When things begin softening and browning turn the heat down a bit. Continue cooking for another 10 minutes are so until the vegetables are very soft and fragrant.

Add the garlic and cook for another minute. Add the wine and cook for a couple of minutes until evaporated. Add the tomatoes and a bit more salt. Stir well and then simmer for about 15 minutes until reduced and saucy. Taste and adjust seasoning.

Serve with any kind of pasta, over rice or quinoa or other grains or polenta.

Homemade Veggie Bouillon

Repeat from last week. . . You may have some of the ingredients leftover from previous weeks that you need for making this workhorse (and more fresh celery this week), fresh veggie stock I always keep on hand (you can skip the celery root this time of year and use a bit more stalk celery, carrot etc. and you can also skip the dried tomato). If you made it and used it in the soup above you would need to buy more leeks so you can also just use water in the soup above and skip making the bouillon.

5 ounces leek, sliced and well-washed 
(about 1 medium)
7 ounces carrots, well scrubbed and chopped
 (about 3-4 medium)
3.5 ounces celery (about 2 big stalks)
3.5 ounces celery root (celeriac), peeled and chopped (about a 3” x 3″ chunk)
1 ounce sun-dried tomatoes
 (about 6 dried tomatoes)
3.5 ounces onion or shallots, peeled (2 small shallots or 1/2 a small-medium onion)
1 medium garlic clove
6 ounces sea salt or kosher salt (scant 1 cup)
1.5 ounces parsley, loosely chopped
 (about 1/3 of a bunch)
2 ounces cilantro, loosely chopped (about ½ bunch)

This recipe requires a food processor. As Heidi notes you can also just make this with what you have. Onions, celery, carrots and parsley are enough. Use the proportions that work for you. Use 1/3 cup salt for each 2 cups of finely processed veggies/herbs.

Place the first four ingredients in your food processor and process until well broken down. Add the next three ingredients, and process again. Add the salt, process some more. Then add the parsley and cilantro. You may need to stir up the vegetables and herbs, so they all get processed evenly.

You should end up with a moist, loose paste of sorts. Pack the paste into a quart jar or container and freeze it for  the next 2-3 months. Because of all the salt the bouillon stays scoop-able when frozen for easy use.

Start by using 2 teaspoons of bouillon per 1 cup (250 ml), and adjust from there based on your personal preference.

Schmorgurken (German Braised Cucumbers)

There are many variations of this dish in Germany and I grew up with this simple, sweet and sour vegetarian one. Often ground beef or small meatballs are added to the mix and sometimes also tomato. I don’t know of any cooked cucumber dishes in the states but having grown up with this one it doesn’t seem odd to me and is well worth a try. The quantities are squishy for this recipe, confirmed by my mother when I called her about the recipe. Just scale up or down to taste and depending on what you have.

Olive oil
2 large or 3 medium cucumbers, peeled and cut in half lengthwise and seeds removed with a teaspoon
½ cup sour cream
1 tablespoon white wine or cider vinegar
2 teaspoons sugar
Salt and lots of freshly ground pepper
2-3 tablespoons chopped fresh dill (you can substitute parsley but dill is best)
Cooked rice for serving.

Put your rice on to cook—we grew up eating this over long grain white rice but you could by all means use brown as well.

Cut the halved cucumbers into ½-inch half rounds. In a large, heavy skillet sauté the cucumber slices in a bit of olive oil over medium to medium-high heat, stirring frequently. They will release quite a bit of liquid, which is great. It will add to the sauce. When they are translucent and softening (about 10 minutes) add the sour cream, vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper. Simmer for about 5 minutes more until the cucumbers are completely tender and the sauce has thickened a little. Add the dill, taste and adjust for salt and pepper and serve hot over rice.

Poblano Notes

Poblano peppers are central to Mexican cuisine. They are meaty, fragrant and very flavorful and greatly vary in their level of heat/spice with most of them being fairly mild. They are usually roasted (or broiled) and peeled and seeded before either stuffing or adding to salsas, soups, sauces, etc.  Chiles en nogada  and chile relleno are the two most famous Mexican dishes featuring poblano  peppers. Poblano peppers turn red and almost black when fully mature and when dried are called chili ancho. 

Corn, Poblano and Feta Pizza

This pizza was a last minute creation last year and became part of the repertoire. Grand Central Bakery’s whole wheat pizza dough is perfect here. By all means make your own if you have time.

1 ball pizza dough (14 ounces, more or less)
Kernels form 3 ears of corn
2 tablespoons minced onion (optional)
3 poblanos, broiled until black and blistered, peeled and deseeded and finely chopped
½ cup crumbled feta
½ or so cup finely diced tomatoes
Olive oil
Salt

Preheat oven (or grill) to 500 degrees with a pizza stone if you have one.

Flour a pizza peel or the back of a cookie sheet. Stretch out your dough into a nice big round-ish shape and place on the peel. Working quickly brush the dough with a bit of olive oil and then evenly distribute the remaining ingredients. Sprinkle the whole thing with salt.

With a decisive but careful couple of jerks of your wrist transfer the pizza directly onto the hot stone. Bake for about 15 minutes or until the edges are browned and the toppings are beginning to brown as well.

 

 

 

 

Comments

Recipes for CSA Week 12

See the post below for Recipes, and scroll down to the next post for the Share Photo, Share List and news from the farm.

If you don’t use your leeks in the parsley soup or the veggie bouillon below, or have some leftover, I would sauté them in a little butter with some diced carrot until soft, then add corn kernels cut off the ears and cook just a bit more. Season well with salt and pepper and some chopped parsley and serve as a side to anything or stir in some eggs for a lovely scramble with a bit of cheese.

I included a few recipes that call for celery in case you have some leftover from last week like I do.

Happy cooking!

Salad with Creamy Miso Dressing
Lentils, Eggplant, and Roasted Tomatoes with Feta
Watermelon, Cucumber, Feta and Black olive Salad
Grated Carrot Salad with Parsley and Jalapenos
Parsley Soup (with Leeks and Potato)
Homemade Veggie Bouillon
Simple Pumpkin Seed Sauce (with Fish or Chicken)

Salad with Creamy Miso Dressing

This dressing is delicious and mellow and appropriate for great variety of salads. I used it on a salad of lettuce, tomatoes, sweet onions, celery (from last week), cilantro and toasted sunflower seeds. This week I would use some fresh (raw) sweet corn, cucumbers, lettuce, parsley and tomatoes.

salad with creamy miso dressing, seeds, etc

Serves 4

6 cups lettuce, washed, dried and torn or chopped
1 medium tomato, diced
2 tablespoons thinly sliced or diced onion
½ cup thinly sliced celery (if you have some leftover)
1 cup diced cucumber
Kernels from one ear of corn (raw or briefly cooked if you’d like)
½ cup roughly chopped parsley leaves
1/3 cup toasted sunflower or pumpkin seeds

Dressing:
1 tablespoon yellow or red miso
1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar
1 tablespoon Mirin (rice cooking wine)
3 tablespoons Greek or regular, plain yogurt (full fat preferably)
1 tablespoon heavy cream or olive oil
Plenty of freshly ground black pepper
¼ teaspoon ground cumin
Sea Salt

creamy miso dressing

Put all salad ingredients in a large salad bowl. Mix the dressing in a small bowl and pour about 2/3 of the dressing over the salad. Toss, taste and adjust seasoning or add more dressing. Serve immediately.

Lentils, Eggplant, and Roasted Tomatoes with Feta
–inspired by an old recipe of Ottolenghi’s in the Guardian

I made this on the fly last night with what I had--I didn't yet have the eggplant from pick up so I skipped that part. I sautéed the vegetables instead of roasting them to save time and I mixed the feta with some Greek yogurt and lots of chopped cilantro and some lemon juice. It was a tasty, simply supper.

I made this on the fly last night with what I had–I didn’t yet have the eggplant from pick up so I skipped that part. I sautéed the vegetables instead of roasting them to save time and I mixed the feta with some Greek yogurt and lots of chopped cilantro and some lemon juice. It was a tasty, simply supper.

2 medium or 1 large eggplant (use whatever you get this week—you might as well roast them all if you have several)
Sea salt and black pepper
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 1/3 cups small green or brown lentils
3 small carrots, scrubbed
2 sticks of celery
1 bay leaf
1 small onion
4 tablespoons olive oil
2 tomatoes, diced
1 teaspoon brown sugar
Large handful chopped parsley
Feta

Put the eggplants on an sheet pan and place about 6-8 inches under the broiler (or on hot grill) for 35-45 minutes, turning them a few times, until the skin cracks and the flesh is cooked through  – they will likely burst open.

Remove from the oven and when cool enough to handle scoop the flesh into a colander, removing the blackened skin. Leave to drain for at least 15 minutes, then season with salt and stir in 1 1/2 teaspoons of the vinegar.

Meanwhile, put the lentils in a medium saucepan with one carrot and half a celery stick chopped into rough chunks. Add the bay and onion, cover with plenty of water, bring to a boil and simmer for 20to 25 minutes or until lentils are tender but still keep their shape. Drain, discard the carrot, celery, bay and onion, and transfer to a bowl. Add the rest of the vinegar and two tablespoons of oil and salt and freshly ground black pepper. Stir and set aside.

Set your oven to 350. Cut the remaining carrot and celery into ½ inch dice and mix with the tomatoes, a tablespoon of oil, some salt and the sugar. Spread in an ovenproof dish and roast for 20 minutes.

Add the cooked vegetables to the lentils, then the chopped parsley, stir. Adjust the seasoning to taste. Spoon on to serving plates. Top with the eggplant and crumbled feta and finish with a drizzle of good olive oil.

Watermelon, Cucumber, Feta and Black olive Salad
–inspired by Racheleats.com

watermelon, feta olive salad

Serves 4 as a starter. If serving as a starter you might serve it alongside a plate of prosciutto.

1/3 cup thinly sliced Walla Walla Sweet (if you have some leftover from last week) or sliced, mild red onion
A handful of parsley, tough stems removed and leaves just chopped a little (you want nice leafy pieces)
A sprig of mint, roughly torn
A few black olives, pitted
1 lb juicy watermelon, peeled, deseeded and cut into bite-sized cubes
1 small cucumber, peeled if skin is tough/chewy, and diced
4 ounces feta, cut in medium cubes or crumbled
3 tablespoons good olive oil
Lemon or lime juice to taste
Freshly ground black pepper

Pull the parsley leaves from the stalks, wash and dry them.

Put the watermelon, cucumber, feta, parsley, mint, onion and black olives into a shallow bowl or on a platter. Then spoon over the olive oil, add a good squeeze of lemon juice and a twist of black pepper. Then using your hands toss the salad very gently so that the feta and melon don’t lose their shape. Taste, and add more lemon or lime juice, olive oil or pepper to taste. Serve immediately.

Grated Carrot Salad with Jalapenos and Parsley

I make a variety of carrot salads. They add bright and fresh flavors year-round. Carrot salads are the perfect foil for the cook-with-what-you-have approach. Cumin, coriander, chili flakes, jalapenos, lemon, lime (juice and zest), rice vinegar, parsley, mint, cilantro, tarragon, and basil are all wonderful complements to the carrots. Toasted nuts and seeds of many kinds are good too.

You can add cooked white beans to this salad for a more robust version. Make a little extra dressing and you have a great lunch or light supper.

With a simple frittata and a piece of good bread, this makes a lovely dinner.

Serves 4

1/2 cup sunflower seeds (or pumpkin seeds)
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 generous pinches of sea salt
4-5 medium carrots, grated
3 tablespoons chopped parsley
½ jalapeno, seeded and minced (or more or less to taste)
feta, crumbled (optional)

Dressing:
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Sea salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, a generous amount, to taste
3 tablespoons good olive oil

Preheat oven to 350.

Toss the sunflower seeds with a teaspoon or two of oil and several pinches of salt and roast on a baking sheet for about 15 minutes, turning frequently, until they are crisp and golden. Set aside to cool.

Place the grated carrots, jalapeno and parsley in a serving bowl. To make the dressing whisk together the lemon juice, salt, pepper and oil. Pour the dressing over the carrots and mix well. Sprinkle with the seeds, mix again, and adjust seasoning and serve.

Parsley Soup
–slightly adapted from Racheleats.com

I loved discovering this idea and it’s a great soup for hot weather as it’s best at room temperature or cold.

Serves 2-4

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons butter
2-3 good-sized leeks, white and light green part, well washed and sliced
2-3 small-medium potatoes scrubbed well and chopped
1 large bunch parsley – leaves separated from stems and stems coarsely chopped.
½ cup dry white wine (optional)
4 cups water, vegetable broth (homemade veggie bouillon, see below) or chicken stock
Salt

Warm the oil and butter in a soup pot and then sweat the leeks and parsley stalks gently, uncovered for 20 minutes. Add the potato, stir and then the wine. Allow the wine to evaporate away and the add the water or stock, a pinch of salt and some freshly ground black pepper.

Simmer for another 20 minutes.

Coarsely chop the parsley leaves and add them to the pan and simmer for two minutes.

Blend the soup with an immersion blender or in a food processor but don’t overprocess—some texture is good, and taste, adjust seasoning. Serve at room temperature or chilled with a dollop or Greek yogurt or some good olive oil and bread.

Homemade Veggie Bouillon

You have some of the ingredients this week you need for making this workhorse, fresh veggie stock I always keep on hand (you can skip the celery root this time of year and use a bit more stalk celery, carrot etc. and you can also skip the dried tomato).

veg bouillon 2 tsp

5 ounces leek, sliced and well-washed 
(about 1 medium)
7 ounces carrots, well scrubbed and chopped
 (about 3-4 medium)
3.5 ounces celery (about 2 big stalks)
3.5 ounces celery root (celeriac), peeled and chopped (about a 3” x 3″ chunk)
1 ounce sun-dried tomatoes
 (about 6 dried tomatoes)
3.5 ounces onion or shallots, peeled (2 small shallots or 1/2 a small-medium onion_
1 medium garlic clove
6 ounces sea salt or kosher salt (scant 1 cup)
1.5 ounces parsley, loosely chopped
 (about 1/3 of a bunch)
2 ounces cilantro, loosely chopped (about ½ bunch)

This recipe requires a food processor. As Heidi notes you can also just make this with what you have. Onions, celery, carrots and parsley are enough. Use the proportions that work for you. Use 1/3 cup salt for each 2 cups of finely processed veggies/herbs.

Place the first four ingredients in your food processor and process until well broken down. Add the next three ingredients, and process again. Add the salt, process some more. Then add the parsley and cilantro. You may need to stir up the vegetables and herbs, so they all get processed evenly.

You should end up with a moist, loose paste of sorts. Pack the paste into a quart jar or container and freeze it for  the next 2-3 months. Because of all the salt the bouillon stays scoop-able when frozen for easy use.

Start by using 2 teaspoons of bouillon per 1 cup (250 ml), and adjust from there based on your personal preference.

Simple Pumpkin Seed Jalapeno Sauce (with Fish or Chicken)
–from Truly Mexican by Roberto Santibanez

This is delicious and rich from the pumpkin seeds. It’s wonderful with fish, poached chicken or shrimp. Or use it to make enchiladas or toss it with boiled potatoes or roasted vegetables or over eggs. If using white fish fillets or shrimp you will add them to the sauce raw, if using chicken, have it poached or pre-cooked in some way and then add—see below.

1 cup raw pumpkin seeds
1/3 cup chopped onion
2-3 jalapenos, chopped (de-seed if you want it less spicy)
1 small garlic clove
½ teaspoon dried oregano (or 1 tsp fresh)
¼ teaspoon ground cumin
½ teaspoon or more, sea salt
4-5 cups chicken or vegetable stock, divided (could use veggie bouillon if you make it—recipe above)
2 tablespoons olive oil
½ cup chopped cilantro
Lime wedges if you’re serving with fish

Heat a skillet over medium heat and toast the pumpkin seeds, stirring and tossing often until they are puffed and slightly browned, about 6-8 minutes.

Put he pumpkin seeds in a blender along with the onion, chiles, garlic, oregano, cumin, salt and 2 cups of stock and blend until the mixture is very smooth.

Heat the oil in a large pan (if you’re going to add meat/fish later) or a smaller pan, if not, over medium heat and carefully pour in the sauce. It will splatter and use a splatter screen if you have one to avoid a mess. Cook the sauce until thickened a bit, about 5 minutes. Add just enough stock to thin the sauce to a velvety consistency that thickly coats a wooden spoon. Simmer, partially covered, adding more stock to maintain the consistency for about 20 more minutes.

Return about 1 cup of the sauce (or all of it if the sauce has broken and looks curdled) to the blender, then add the cilantro and blend until smooth. Be very careful when blending hot liquids and do it in batches to avoid a hot mess. Now return the sauce to the pot and simmer for a few more minutes. Swish a little water around in the blender to get all the sauce loosened up and add it to the pan. Taste and adjust seasoning. If you’re using cooked chicken add it to the sauce and cook on low until heated through. If you’re using fish or shrimp season it well with salt and add to the pan and cook gently until the fish is cooked through and serve with lime wedges and more cilantro.

 

 

 

 

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