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CSA Week 21: October 14 to October 16

This Week’s Share

Crop

Family Share

Half Share

Beets, Kestrel Red 3 pounds 1 1/2 pounds
Chard, Rhubarb Red 2 bunches 1 bunch
Chicory, Radicchio 1 large head 1 small head
Leeks, King Richard 6 each 3 each
Potatoes, Yukon Gem 4 pounds 2 pounds
Sweet Peppers, Stocky Red Roaster 8 each 4 each
Winter Squash, Baby Blue Hubbard 2 each 1 each

Share Notes

  • Chicory: The chicory family (closely related to lettuce) is a wide and varied group-they can be loose-leafed or tightly-headed, tapered or round, smooth-leaved or frilled. They are also brightly colored, ranging from purest white and pale yellow to bright green or maroon. All members of the chicory family are favored for the bitterness that they all share, unlike lettuces which are chosen for their delicacy. Radicchio is the chicory featured in your share this week, and is also the most commonly know too.
  • Potatoes: The gorgeous Yukon Gem potatoes in your share this week, a newer relative of the well know Yukon Gold, have been selected for their resistance to blight. Here in the Pacific Northwest finding varieties that exhibit natural resistance to blight is critical as that is one of the main disease pressures that can effect the success of a potato crop in the field and storage. You may also notice some potatoes have a pink splash around the eyes which is normal and safe to eat, and is actually a characteristic quality of the Yukon Gem.
  • Winter Squash: From mid-fall and through the end of the season, a variety of winter squash will be in your share. Unlike summer squash, these varieties have thicker skins to help them store longer, and starchy flesh that is tasty when cooked. The Hubbard in particular has a tough skin to cut, but the mild yet deep flavor and creamy texture makes it worth the effort.

The Bounty Continues this Winter at Grand Central Bakery

We are happy to bring you an extension of our regular season shares with our first ever Winter Storage Share. We are selling a limited number of shares, so don’t miss the chance to join us from mid-December 2014 until early March 2015. We will carefully create each share so you can enjoy delicious, hearty winter boxes with an exciting array of flavors, textures, and colors to keep a smile on your face and inviting smells in your kitchen all winter long. Most of the varieties we are growing for the Winter CSA are attentively selected and bred by local seed producers from the PNW, so you can feel great supporting these excellent small family businesses and helping to maintain genetic diversity when you sign up!

We are able to bring you this exciting opportunity in part with the help of our friends at Grand Central Bakery. They will be hosting our pick-up locations in SE Portland at their Hawthorne store and also in North Portland at their Fremont store. They are able to offer us convenient pick-up areas located inside of the store protected from any severe and freezing winter weather. In addition to that, each member picking-up at one of our Grand Central Bakery locations will receive voucher for a free loaf of bread with each share box for the winter season. Delicious winter veggies and fresh locally baked bread, it doesn’t get much better than that. See more details below, and of course email us with any questions or to join.

Number of Deliveries: 7 (spanning 14 weeks)

Price: $610 (one share size)

The Bounty: beets, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, celeriac, chicories, garlic, herbs, kohlrabi, leeks, onions, parsnips, *potatoes, pie pumpkins, daikon radishes, shallots & numerous varieties of winter squash (see a Sample Week chart below)

Quantity: approximately 35 pounds per delivery, intended to last for the 2 weeks between deliveries

Delivery Dates:

  • Week of December 15 & 29, January 12 & 26, February 9 & 23 and March 9

Delivery locations:

  • N: Grand Central Bakery @ 714 N Fremont
  • SE: Grand Central Bakery @ 2230 SE Hawthorne
  • SW: Food Front Co-op on SW Capitol Highway
  • NW: The Farm 13615 NW Howell Park Rd
  • Other possible locations to be announced
  • Please email us at csa@sauvieislandorganics.com and we will sign you up for this exciting new option.

Checks can be mailed to: SIO, 20233 NW Sauvie Island Rd. Portland, OR 97231
or Call the office 503-621-6921 to pay by Credit Card

*Several of our potato varieties will be coming from transitional acreage (acreage that we are now growing on organically but had been farmed conventionally within the past 3 years).

Sample Week

Quantity

Beets, Cylindra

3 pounds

Cabbage, January King

1 head

Carrots, Necoras

3 pounds

Kohlrabi, Gigante

1 each

Leeks, King Seig

6 each

Onions, Cortland

4 each

Parsnips, Gladiator

4 pounds

Potatoes, Yukon Gold

6 pounds

Raddichio, Leonardo

2 each

Winter Squash,

Nutter Butter

Butternut Squash

2 each

Comments

Recipes for CSA Week 21

Yes, I think it’s really fall now. Lots of fall-like dishes here this week. Pick up a bunch of cilantro and cook some white beans (for two of the dishes this week) if you’d like. The Cilantro, Chard and White Bean Soup is really one of my all time favorite meals. And I have been so enjoying all the sweet peppers and below are a couple of my favorite pepper recipes.

Portuguese Chard, Leek, White Bean and Cilantro Soup
Radicchio, Beets, Filberts/Walnuts, Goat Cheese/Blue Cheese
Hubbard Squash Note
Roasted Squash and Beets with Dukkah and Thyme
Roasted Pepper Salad with Cumin, Sherry Vinegar and Jamon Serrano
Quick-Pickled Sweet Peppers with Rosemary
Romesco with Roasted Potatoes
Leeks and White Beans with Sausages

Portuguese Chard, Leek, White Bean and Cilantro Soup

best soup with egg

This is my favorite soup, I believe, of all time. If you have cooked (or canned) beans on hand this soup comes together in 20-30 minutes and is one of the most satisfying one-dish meals I know.

1 cup dried white beans, soaked (cannelini, great northern, Ayers Creek white beans of any kind, Rancho Gordo Marrow beans . . . ) or 1 14 oz. can of cannelini or other white beans
2 tablespoons olive oil
2-3 leeks (about 2 generous cups, chopped), well washed, cut in half lengthwise and cut into half-rounds
5 large cloves garlic
6 cups home-made veggie bouillon broth or vegetable stock
2 cups packed cilantro
1 large bunch chard, stems removed, coarsely chopped (about 4 cups)
sliced crusty bread (4 slices)
4 eggs
Salt and pepper, to taste
Good olive oil for drizzling

Cook the soaked beans in water with a clove of the garlic until soft about 25 minutes if small. Drain and set aside. You could also use canned beans.

Heat olive oil in a large pot. Sauté the leeks in olive oil until limp. Add three cloves of garlic, minced. Continue sautéing until the garlic is soft but not brown about 2 minutes, lower heat as needed. Add four cups of the stock and bring to a simmer. Add the beans and continue to simmer for a minute or two. Add the chard to the pot and cook for a few minutes. Blend the cilantro with the reserved 2 cups of bouillon in a blender. Add the cilantro mixture and season with salt and pepper. Bring mixture to a rapid simmer. Crack eggs into soup, cover and let poach about 5 minutes until the yolks and whites are just set.

While eggs are cooking toast the bread slices and rub with remaining garlic cloves. You can rub one or both sides of the toast with garlic–depending on much you love garlic. Lay the bread in the bottom of a soup bowl. Ladle the soup over. Top with poached egg. Drizzle with good olive oil and grind some pepper over the top.

Beets, Radicchio, Goat Cheese/Blue Cheese and Filberts/Walnuts

I made this with the addition of the last bit of lettuce from last week's share but it was 90% radicchio. I used filberts and goat cheese and it was wonderful.

I made this with the addition of the last bit of lettuce from last week’s share but it was 90% radicchio. I used filberts and goat cheese and it was wonderful.

A classic and wonderful combination of ingredients.

3 roasted or boiled beets, peeled and diced or cut into bite-sized wedges
About 4 cups radicchio, washed, dried and torn or chopped
½ cup or more toasted walnuts or filberts, roughly chopped
2 ounces fresh goat cheese or blue cheese, crumbled
1 tablespoon sherry or red one vinegar (more to taste)
2 tablespoons good olive oil
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper

Toss the radicchio and nuts with the dressing ingredients. Add the cheese and beets and gently toss again. Taste and adjust seasoning.

Hubbard Squash Note

I love Hubbard squash. Its dense, rich meat is great in “pumpkin” pies as well as stews, mashes, sautés, etc. If you have some time or can do it in advance, you’ll make it easier on yourself if you bake the squash whole (or halved and seeds and strings removed) in a 400-degree oven for 20 minutes or so which softens it enough to peel and cube it more easily.

Roasted Winter Squash and Beets with Dukkah and Thyme

winter squash and beets with dukkah and thyme

I love this combination of creamy, sweet roasted squash and beets and the warmly spiced, crunchy Dukkah. Dukkah (the spice and nut mixture) is delicious sprinkled on most anything—roasted vegetables, salads, grilled meats, you name it. This dish makes a lovely side or lunch with some hummus and toast and/or a green salad. You can use other vegetables as well but this combination is particularly beautiful and delicious.

This is a little bit of a project–timing the toasting of the spices and then letting them cool but it’s well worth it and it makes enough for quite a few dishes/meals.

Dukkah:

1/2 cup almonds
3 tablespoons coriander seeds
2 tablespoons cumin seeds
3 tablespoons sesame seeds
1/4 cup unsweetened dried shredded coconut
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Roasted winter squash and beets, cut into bite-sized chunks, warm or at room temperature
1 teaspoon thyme leaves, fresh or dried, chopped or crumbled a bit
Olive oil
Salt

For the dukkah: In a medium skillet over medium heat, toast the almonds until golden, about 4 minutes. Transfer the almonds to a work surface to cool, and then finely chop them.

Put the coriander and cumin seeds in the same skillet and toast, stirring until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Transfer the seeds to a spice grinder and allow them to cool completely before coarsely grinding.

In a medium bowl, combine the almonds with the ground spices.

Put the sesame seeds in the same skillet and toast them over medium heat, stirring until golden, about 2 minutes. Transfer to the spice grinder.

Toast the coconut in the skillet over medium heat, stirring constantly until golden (be careful not to burn!), about 2 minutes. Add the toasted coconut to the grinder and let it cool completely.

Grind the sesame seeds and coconut to a coarse powder. Combine with the almond and spice mixture and season with salt and pepper. Store in an airtight container. Dukkah will keep for 1-2 months but will begin to loose its fragrance after that.

Toss the roasted vegetables with a bit of olive oil and a little salt. Sprinkle generously with dukkah and thyme. Taste and adjust seasoning and serve.

Roasted Pepper Salad with Cumin, Sherry Vinegar and Jamon Serrano

This is a Spanish-style composed salad. I make it several times a year when peppers are abundant and varied in the early fall. It’s a beautiful, even elegant dish and worth all the roasting and peeling time.

8 peppers, ideally a sweet Italian roasteres—broiled until blackened and blistered and seeded and peeled and coarsely chopped
4 – 5 roma or other sauce-type tomatoes, quartered, sprinkled with salt and roasted in a very hot (450~) oven until soft and browning around the edges, about 15 minutes
1/4 of a medium (red) onion, sliced as thinly as you can
1 clove of garlic, minced
2 hardboiled eggs, finely chopped
Salt
¼ teaspoon ground cumin
2 teaspoons sherry or champagne or red wine vinegar
olive oil
salt and pepper
8-10 slices Jamon Serrano or Prosciutto

Arrange the roasted peppers and tomatoes on a platter. Scatter over the slivered onions and sprinkle the hardboiled eggs over the vegetables.

In a small bowl mix the cumin, salt, olive oil, pepper, garlic and vinegar. Drizzle the dressing over everything and top with the slices of jamon. Enjoy with some good bread.

Pickled Sweet Peppers with Rosemary

pickled peppers rosemary II

These simple pickled peppers are fun to have around to serve on burgers, as part of an antipasto plate, or on egg salad crostini or sandwiches.

For about 3-4 pints:

3 lbs sweet red and/or yellow roasting peppers
A little olive oil
Salt

Brine:

2 1/2 cups white wine vinegar
2/3 cup sugar
Handful of fresh rosemary leaves
1/8 – 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Combine the vinegar, sugar and rosemary leaves and red pepper flakes in a saucepan. Simmer covered for about 3 minutes. Set aside.

Preheat the broiler and position the rack about 8 inches from the element. Wash and dry the peppers and cut in half lengthwise and remove seeds and veins. Rub peppers with olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Arrange peppers, skin side up on baking sheet and broil until skin is blistering and peppers have softened a bit, about 6-10 minutes. Check and reposition peppers to ensure even broiling. When cool enough to handle peel the peppers as best you can—it’s fine if some of the skin sticks to the peppers. Pack the peppers into jars and add the still-warm brine. Cool, then cover and refrigerate. They’ll keep for many months.

Romesco

romesco

This sauce is quite forgiving. The important thing is that it has a good bite from vinegar, the texture from the grilled bread and the sweetness of the slowly fried garlic and ground almonds. Many combinations of peppers will work.

2 sweet peppers, broiled until black and blistered, deseeded and peeled or 2 dried New Mexican chilies
1 large tomato, fresh or roasted and frozen (and then thawed)
1 fresh or dried Aci Sivri pepper (Ayers Creek farm in Gaston Oregon grows and sells these mildly hot Turkish peppers at the Hillsdale Farmers’ Market, near Portland) (optional)
1 small fresh hot pepper (Czech Black, Serrano etc) roasted and peeled and deseeded or 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
3 cloves garlic, fried slowly in olive oil until golden brown and soft
1 thick slice crusty bread, fried in the garlic oil until dark brown and crisp
2 tablespoons toasted almonds (marcona almonds if you have them, though I never do and regular ones work fine)
2 tablespoons sherry or red wine vinegar or a combination (or less if you’re using the New Mexican chiles)
1/3 cup olive oil, or more as needed
Salt

If you’re using dried New Mexican chilies destem and seed them and simmer them with 3/4 cup water and 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar for 5 minutes. Drain most of the liquid but reserve the rest in case you need a bit more kick. And if you’re using New Mexican chiles then only add 2 teaspoons of vinegar since the rehydrating liquid will have infused the peppers with some vinegar.

Process the toasted bread, garlic and almonds in the food processor until well-chopped. Add the remaining ingredients except the oil. Process everything until smooth, finally adding the oil. Taste and adjust seasoning. It should have a good vinegary kick. Thin with more of the re-hydrating liquid if desired.

Romesco with Roasted Potatoes

Good for a crowd, good at room temperature and just robust and beautiful and tasty! You can scale this however you want but it’s worth making a good amount and the potatoes can always be warmed up the next day if you have any leftover, and you could use leftover potatoes to make a hash or add to a scramble and top with more romesco.

2 1/2 lbs (or more–see head note) waxy potatoes
2-3 bay leaves
8 cloves garlic, unpeeled
Salt
Olive oil
Chopped fresh parsley
1 cup (or more) Romesco (recipe above)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Scrub the potatoes and cut into large chunks or leave whole if small. Toss the potatoes with 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt, garlic and bay leaves. Put potatoes into a large cast iron skillet or other oven proof dish or sheet pan. (You will finish the dish on the stove top so using something that can be in the oven and on a burner saves a step.) Cover the pan tightly with foil and roast for about 35-50 minutes until tender.

Remove foil and remove pan from the oven and set on the stove top. Smash the potatoes gently to flatten a bit but so they stay in one piece more or less. Cook over medium high-heat, undisturbed for 6-7 minutes until deeply browned. Remove bay leaves and discard. Put potatoes on a serving dish and squeeze roasted garlic out of its skins and toss with potatoes. Top with chopped parsley and romesco.

White Beans with Leeks and Sausage

I made up this dish a few years ago with some large, creamy, and amazingly delicious beans (mortgage runner beans) a friend grows. The flavor and texture combination is worth trying with whatever white bean (or borlotti/cranberry type) you have on hand. Be sure to soak them over night and then cook them slowly with a bay leaf, garlic clove and chunk of onion, until tender. And make sure to let the beans cool in their cooking liquid for at least an hour or two before using. This vastly improves flavor and texture of the beans. And this is why I never cook the beans when I need them in the moment but I cook them when I’m making something else and in the kitchen anyway and am not in a rush for them.

This is more technique than recipe and is one of those that can be endlessly adapted and is thus what I call a CSA heavy hitter. Use kale or onions instead of leeks, or all three; change the ratio of vegetables to beans. Use bacon instead of sausage or leftover chicken or no meat at all. The beans have plenty of protein and richness. Change the herbs to suit your taste/what you have on hand. Add spices, maybe chili flakes or cumin and coriander. Add a teaspoon or two of Dijon mustard and some garlic. Scale it up or down . . .you get the idea!

Olive oil
3 cups cooked beans, drained (see headnote)
2 pork sausages, spicy if you like, sliced into rounds or crumbled
2 large leeks, trimmed, well washed, cut in half lengthwise and then cut into thin half moons
1 teaspoon of fresh or dried thyme, savory or sage
Salt and pepper

In a large skillet heat a little olive oil over medium high heat. Add the leeks, sausage and herbs and a couple of pinches of salt. Stir well and sauté for a few minutes until the leeks start taking on a little color. Turn the heat down if things are browning too much. Cover the pan and cook for another 10 minutes or so until the leeks are soft. Stir in the beans and cook long enough to heat through. Season with freshly ground black pepper and ad salt if needed. Serve with another drizzle of good olive oil.

Comments

CSA Week 20: October 7 to October 9

This Week’s Share

Crop

Family Share

Half Share

Beets 3 pounds 1 1/2 pounds
Carrots 2 pounds 1 pound
Collard Greens 2 bundles 1 bundle
Fennel 2 bulbs 1 bulb
Lettuce 2 heads 1 head
Onions, Cortland Yellow 4 each 2 each
Sweet Peppers, Stocky Red & Stocky Gold Roasters 10 each 5 each
Winter Squash, Acorn 2 each 1 each

Share Notes

  • Lettuce: Apologies for misleading you last week, but our endless summer allowed for us to pull one more harvest of head lettuce for your shares this week. This is the last time for a true lettuce this season, and this time it’s for real.
  • Sweet Peppers: The sweet peppers in your share this week are the Stocky Red and Stocky Gold Roasters. They are sweet and crisp with thinner walls making them great for roasting (as the name indicates).

Join SIO for our Winter Storage Share

After many years of requests, Sauvie Island Organics is now selling a limited number of Winter Storage Shares! We have conducted several years of variety trials, storage evaluations, taste tests, and now we are finally ready to invite you to share in the bounty of the farm from mid-December 2014 until early March 2015. We carefully create each share so you can enjoy delicious, hearty winter boxes with an exciting array of flavors, textures, and colors to keep a smile on your face and inviting smells in your kitchen all winter long. We will deliver every other week for 14 weeks, to several drop sites conveniently located around Portland.

Many of the storage crops will be harvested in the late fall, when cool, wet weather and crisp nights bring out their natural sweetness, making for some of the most excellent eats of the entire year! In addition to our favorite staple varieties we have been trialing rare, heirloom, and lesser known types of old favorites from around the world, so you can look forward to yellow French carrots, delectable German Butterball potatoes, savory Dutch Red shallots, nutty Japanese Kabocha winter squash, juicy heirloom Kohlrabi, crispy Daikon radishes, and more. We love these unusual varieties and we know you will too. Most of the varieties we are growing for the Winter CSA are attentively selected and bred by local seed producers from the PNW, so you can feel great supporting these excellent small family businesses and helping to maintain genetic diversity when you sign up! Details below:

Number of Deliveries: 7 (spanning 14 weeks)

Price: $610 (one share size)

The Bounty: beets, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, celeriac, chicories, garlic, herbs, kohlrabi, leeks, onions, parsnips, *potatoes, pie pumpkins, daikon radishes, shallots & numerous varieties of winter squash

Quantity: approximately 35 pounds per delivery

Delivery Dates:
  • Week of December 15 & 29, January 12 & 26, February 9 & 23 and March 9

Delivery locations:

  • N/NE: Grand Central Bakery 721 N Fremont
  • SE: Grand Central Bakery at 2230 SE Hawthorne
  • SW: Food Front Co-op on SW Capitol Highway
  • NW: The Farm 13615 NW Howell Park Rd
  • Other locations to be announced

Please email us at csa@sauvieislandorganics.com and we will sign you up for this exciting new option.
Checks can be mailed to: SIO, 20233 NW Sauvie Island Rd. Portland, OR 97231
or Call the office 503-621-6921 to pay by Credit Card

*Several of our potato varieties will be coming from transitional acreage (acreage that we are now growing on organically but had been farmed conventionally within the past 3 years).

Farm to City: A Benefit for the Sauvie Island Center

Join our friends at the Sauvie Island Center for their annual fall harvest tasting and benefit event. The event is this Thursday, October 9th on the Rooftop of Earth Advantage, 623 SW Oak Street, downtown Portland. Proceeds will benefit the Sauvie Island Center. Ticket price is $35 and includes entrance to the rooftop event and heavy appetizers. Local beer, wine and cider will be available for purchase. For more information and to purchase tickets visit http://www.sauvieislandcenter.org/events/farm-to-city/.

It’s Pepper Roasting Season! Buy Bulk Roasting Peppers from SIO

Similar to tomatoes this season, we’ve often been asked if we have any sweet peppers available in bulk for roasting and preserving for the off season. Well, finally this season the answer is yes! We will be offering 10lb boxes of our Stocky Red Roaster and Stocky Gold Roaster sweet peppers for pick-up at the farm only, and will be setting up orders for pick-up this coming weekend (October 10-12). The red and gold varieties we are offering for bulk boxes are a bit smaller and have thinner walls making them well suited for all your roasting and preserving needs.

  • $25 for 10lb box of Roasting Peppers (choose all red, all gold, or a mix)

To pick-up your order this weekend at the farm please order by 12pm (noon) Thursday 10/9. All orders will be available for pick-up at the farm 12pm (Noon) Friday 10/10 through 5pm Sunday 10/12. To place an order email the farm at csa@sauvieislandorganics.com with your name, number of 10lb boxes you’d like. You will receive an email confirming your order and directions for how to pick-up from the farm. Please invite your non-CSA member friends, neighbors, and co-workers to take advantage of this opportunity and get in on some of the SIO bounty as well.

 

Comments

Recipes for Week 20

Cooler weather is promised for later in the week which is a good thing since the vegetables are calling for slower cooking, warming dishes and hearty flavors. And by all means cook all your beets at once (boiled or roasted) and use them in salads, sandwiches (with goat cheese and herbs and onions). I’ve included a couple of dishes that call for some of last week’s produce (in combination with this weeks’s) as I was slow to get through my last share, but just adapt to this week’s produce if you don’t have anything leftover. . . .Happy cooking!

Braised Fennel, Sweet Peppers and Onions (over Pasta . . .)
Simple Italian-style Chicken with Peppers and Tomatoes
Rich Parsley Soup (link)
“Everything” Frittata
Roasted Winter Squash with Salsa Verde
Classic Sweet, Buttery Baked Acorn Squash
Caramelized Onions with Collard Greens
Onion and Fennel Soup with Cheesy Toast
Beet and Carrot “Lemonade” Salad
Beet Pesto

Braised Fennel, Sweet Peppers and Onions (over Pasta . . .)

braised fennel peppers onions prep

braised fennel plated

Serves 4-6

SIO member Jessica Roberts also sent me a Deborah Madison recipe for a fennel pasta dish that inspired this version. It takes a little while to cook but is dead simple and versatile. I just had it as is for lunch one day this week.

You can toss this dish with just-cooked pasta and a bit of hot pasta cooking water and some grated Parmesan and a good drizzle of olive oil for a luscious dish. Or you can serve it as a side with most anything or top it with an egg. . ..\

1 tablespoon olive oil
2 large fennel bulbs, trimmed and thinly sliced lengthwise
1-2 sweet peppers, trimmed, seeded and sliced
½ large onion, thinly sliced
2 teaspoons cider vinegar (or whatever vinegar you have except for balsamic which is too sweet)
1 ½ cups water, divided
Salt
Chopped fresh parsley (optional)
Grated Parmesan
¾ lb pasta (optional)
Good olive oil

Heat the oil in a large, heavy skillet over high heat. Add the onions, fennel and pepper and a pinch or two of salt. Toss well and cook over high heat for 7-10 minutes or so, stirring frequently until the vegetables are browning in places. Add the vinegar and 1 cup water and a bit more salt. Cover and simmer for about 10 minutes or until the water is mostly absorbed. Add the remaining ½ cup water and continue cooking until the fennel is tender throughout and all the water has been absorbed/evaporated. Taste and adjust seasoning and drizzle with a little good olive oil. See headnote for serving suggestions.

Simple Italian-style Chicken with Peppers and Tomatoes

Italian-style chicken peppers tomatoes

Such a satisfying and simple dish. A big green salad and/or some crusty bread and you’re set. And if you still have a few tomatoes lying around you’ll be set.

Serves 4-6

3-4 sweet yellow or red peppers
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 chicken, cut into 10 pieces
¾ cup dry white wine
1- 1 ½ lbs tomatoes, diced
1/3 cup halved, pitted, cured black olives (optional)
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Chopped fresh parsley, optional

Preheat the broiler. Roast the peppers, turning until all sides are blackened and blistered. Remove from oven and put in a bowl, covered by a plate to steam. When cool enough to handle, peel and seed and cut into strips.

Heat the oil in large, deep skillet. Add the chicken pieces, working in batches if you need to, and cook, turning to brown all sides. Return all the chicken to the pan (if you had to work in batches) and season generously with salt and pepper, add the garlic and the wine and cook until most of the wine has evaporated. Stir in the tomatoes and peppers and simmer, loosely covered for about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Add the olives, if using, and cook another 5 or so minutes until the chicken is tender and cooked through. If the sauce is too thin for your taste (as it sometimes is for mine) remove the chicken pieces and keep covered on a plate and reduce the sauce on high heat for a few minutes. Then put the chicken back in.

Rich Parsley Soup

If you still have parsley leftover (or have lots in your garden—both of which I have/had) this soup would be great. Many thanks to SIO member Jessica Roberts for drawing my attention to this fabulous “CSA” recipe. http://www.savorsa.com/2012/03/keep-it-green-with-this-rich-parsley-soup/

“Everything” Frittata

frittat w: everything

I know I include these frequently but this last month has been particularly busy and I often make something like this the night before the next share arrives. I did it yesterday with kale, parsley, sweet peppers, scallions, onions and a bit of egg-but it was more veggies than egg for sure. I had some feta to add as well. I added a little Aleppo pepper which gave it a nice underlying, earthy note.

Serves 4 as an entrée 5-6 as a side.

1-2 tablespoons olive oil
1 onion, thinly sliced
½ bunch scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced
1 cup chopped parsley
1 bunch kale, washed, trimmed and tough stems removed and thinly sliced
2 sweet peppers, washed, seeded and thinly sliced
4-6 eggs (or whatever you have or want to use–see headnote)
Feta or other cheese (optional)
1 teaspoon Aleppo pepper (optional)
Salt

Heat the oil in a heavy sauté pan or well-seasoned cast iron pan or non-stick (if it’s heatproof and can go in the oven). Add the onions, scallions and peppers and a few generous pinches of salt and sauté them over med-high heat, stirring often so as not to burn, for about 5 minutes. Add the kale and continue cooking, covered, until the vegetables are tender. You may need to add a splash of water to ensure even cooking and avoid burning.

Set your oven to broil.

Lightly whisk the eggs until they’re just broken up—no need to get them frothy or really well mixed. Add a few more pinches of salt and several grinds of pepper. Pour eggs over the vegetables and tilt the pan to evenly distribute the eggs. Sprinkle the cheese over the top of the eggs, if using. Cover and cook on medium heat for a few minutes. When the eggs are beginning to set take the pan off the heat and set under the broiler until the eggs are cooked and slightly puffed and golden.

Let the frittata sit for at least 5 minutes before cutting and serving. It will come out of the pan much more easily that way and is more flavorful. Serve with a slice of good, crusty bread and/or a salad.

Roasted Winter Squash with Salsa Verde

Serves 4

I taught this dish in the very first cooking class I ever taught. I’m very fond of it for that reason and because it’s just a nice combination of warm roasted squash and bright, fresh acidic parsley sauce. If you have parsley leftover from last week you can make the sauce or use another herb of your choice.

Halve an acorn squash and scrape out the seeds and strings. Cut into about 2-inch thick wedges. Sprinkle the cut sides generously with salt and drizzle with olive oil. Place cut side down on a baking sheet and bake at 400 degrees until tender when pierced with a fork.

When cool enough to handle, scoop flesh out of skin and place in a bowl, generously drizzle with salsa verde (from previous week’s recipe).

Classic Sweet, Buttery Baked Acorn Squash

My mother used to halve acorn squash, salt the insides and then put a generous pat of butter in each halve and a tablespoon or so of brown sugar. She’d bake them, cut side up on a sheet pan at 350/375 degrees until tender and browning around the edges. Serve as is with a spoon!

Collard Greens with Caramelized Onions

Simple and delicious.

Olive oil, butter or bacon fat
2 onions, thinly sliced
1 bunch collards, tough ends removed but leave the rib in, washed
2-3 cloves garlic, minced
1/8 teaspoon cayenne, optional (or ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes

Caramelize the onions in a wide skillet with a bit of your choice of fat and a few pinches of salt and the cayenne. Stir occasionally and cook for about 15-20 minutes on medium to medium-high heat until very soft and starting to brown.

Meanwhile slice the collard leaves into thin strips and cook in salted, boiling water for 6-8 minutes. You want them to be tender but still bright green with a little texture. Drain well and add to the onions. Mix well and cook for another 5-6 minutes to marry the flavors and soften the greens a bit more. Adjust seasoning to your taste and serve with a squeeze of lemon juice or drizzle of balsamic or sherry vinegar if you’d like.

Onion and Fennel Soup with Cheesy Toast

This is a bit like a simplified French onion soup. The cheesy toast gets a nice kick from the thin layer of mustard, which complements the sweetness of the onions and fennel.

Slice enough onions to make about 3 cups
Slice enough fennel, very thinly (after trimming the bulb) to make 2 1/2 cups
Olive oil
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/2 teaspoon thyme leaves fresh or dried
5 cups chicken stock
Salt and freshly ground pepper
4 slices good, crusty bread
1-2 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard
3 ounces Gruyere, Emmental or sharp cheddar

In a large, heavy pot cook onion and fennel in a bit of olive oil along with the thyme  until soft and translucent and getting pale brown. Add the wine to the onions and scrape the bottom and sides of the pan to get up all the brown bits. Simmer for about 3-4 minutes and then add the chicken stock and bring to a simmer and cook gently for another 10 minutes. Taste and adjust seasoning. Depending on how salty your stock is you’ll need more or less additional salt and pepper.

Meanwhile toast the bread and spread the toast thinly with mustard and then heavily sprinkle the bread with a grated cheese. Put the bread on a baking sheet and set under the broiler until the edges are crisp and brown and the cheese is bubbling.

Portion the soup into wide, deep plates or bowls and top with a cheesy toast and serve immediately.

Carrot and Beet “Lemonade” Salad

This is a sweet tart salad that is hard to stop eating. Quantities listed are just suggestions. You can use whatever you want/have on hand and skip any one of the three main ingredients.

3 medium carrots, grated on the large holes of a box grater or with grating blade of a food processor.
1-2 medium beets, peeled and grated
1 crunchy apple, peeled and grated
2-3 tablespoons lemon juice
1-2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
1 tablespoon honey (warmed a bit if too stiff to mix easily with the other ingredients)
2 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper

Mix the grated vegetables in a salad bowl. Be careful when grating the beet as the beet juice will splatter far and wide. I grate the beet in a bowl in the sink to prevent excessive messes. Add all the dressing ingredients and mix thoroughly. Taste and adjust seasoning.

Add some chopped fresh mint or parsley or chives if you’d like.

Beet Pesto

This is a delicious and beautiful variation on regular pesto. And if you have cooked or roasted beets on hand it’s very quick to pull together. You can serve over grains, hardboiled eggs or other egg dishes or roasted veggies or as a spread or dip. I don’t tend to use it over pasta, however, as somehow the even pink coating doesn’t seem quite right to me.

1 1/2 cups cooked, diced beets
Generous handful of walnuts, toasted or raw (or hazelnuts or almonds)
1 small clove garlic
About ¼ -1/3 cup grated Parmesan or other hard cheese
¼ cup good-tasting olive oil
Salt and pepper
1-2 teaspoons lemon juice or 1 teaspoon of cider, white wine or sherry vinegar

Process the cheese and nuts first until finely ground. Then add the remaining ingredients and process until smooth. Adjust seasoning to your liking.

To use with pasta, dilute with ¼ cup of hot pasta-cooking water before tossing with cooked pasta. Top with extra cheese.

 

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CSA News: Week 19 – September 30 to October 2

This Week’s Share

Crop

Family Share

Half Share

Kale, Lacinato 2 bunches 1 bunch
Lettuce 2 heads 1 head
Onions, Cabernet Red 2 each 1 each
Parsley, Italian Flat Leaf 1 large bunch 1 small bunch
Potatoes, German Butterball 4 pounds 2 pounds
Sweet Peppers, Jolene’s Red and Gatherer’s Gold 8 each 4 each
Winter Squash, Delicata 2 each 1 each

Share Notes

  • Lettuce: Enjoy this last round of head lettuce in your share this week. Slice up some of your beautiful sweet peppers for a fall salad delight.
  • Sweet Peppers: The sweets peppers in your share this week are Jolene’s Red and Gatherer’s Gold. They are big, juicy, and just as great for stuffing whole for an entree as they are raw as a snack. All the seed for the sweet peppers in your shares this season are from regional seed breeders and our friends at Wild Garden Seed.

It’s Pepper Roasting Season! Buy Bulk Roasting Peppers from SIO

Similar to tomatoes this season, we’ve often been asked if we have any sweet peppers available in bulk for roasting and preserving for the off season. Well, finally this season the answer is yes! We will be offering 10lb boxes of our Stocky Red Roaster and Stocky Gold Roaster sweet peppers for pick-up at the farm only, and will be setting up orders for pick-up this coming weekend (October 3-5) and the following weekend (October 10-12). The red and gold varieties we are offering for bulk boxes are a bit smaller and have thinner walls than the peppers in your share this week, making them well suited for all your roasting and preserving needs.

  • $25 for 10lb box of Roasting Peppers (choose all red, all gold, or a mix)

To pick-up your order this weekend at the farm please order by 12pm (noon) Thursday 10/2. All orders will be available for pick-up at the farm 12pm (Noon) Friday 10/3 through 5pm Sunday 10/5. To place an order email the farm at csa@sauvieislandorganics.com with your name, number of 10lb boxes you’d like, and the weekend you want them available for pick-up at the farm (either this weekend 10/3-10/5, or next weekend 10/10-10/12). You will receive an email confirming your order and directions for how to pick-up from the farm. Please invite your non-CSA member friends, neighbors, and co-workers to take advantage of this opportunity and get in on some of the SIO bounty as well.

Don’t Let the Season End in December, Join SIO for our Winter Storage Share

After many years of requests, Sauvie Island Organics is now selling a limited number of Winter Storage Shares! We have conducted several years of variety trials, storage evaluations, taste tests, and now we are finally ready to invite you to share in the bounty of the farm from mid-December 2014 until early March 2015. We carefully create each share so you can enjoy delicious, hearty winter boxes with an exciting array of flavors, textures, and colors to keep a smile on your face and inviting smells in your kitchen all winter long. We will deliver every other week for 14 weeks, to several drop sites conveniently located around Portland.

Many of the storage crops will be harvested in the late fall, when cool, wet weather and crisp nights bring out their natural sweetness, making for some of the most excellent eats of the entire year! In addition to our favorite staple varieties we have been trialing rare, heirloom, and lesser known types of old favorites from around the world, so you can look forward to yellow French carrots, delectable German Butterball potatoes, savory Dutch Red shallots, nutty Japanese Kabocha winter squash, juicy heirloom Kohlrabi, crispy Daikon radishes, and more. We love these unusual varieties and we know you will too. Most of the varieties we are growing for the Winter CSA are attentively selected and bred by local seed producers from the PNW, so you can feel great supporting these excellent small family businesses and helping to maintain genetic diversity when you sign up! Details below:

Number of Deliveries: 7 (spanning 14 weeks)

Price: $610 (one share size)

The Bounty: beets, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, celeriac, chicories, garlic, herbs, kohlrabi, leeks, onions, parsnips, *potatoes, pie pumpkins, daikon radishes, shallots & numerous varieties of winter squash

Quantity: approximately 35 pounds per delivery

Delivery Dates:
  • Week of December 15 & 29, January 12 & 26, February 9 & 23 and March 9

Delivery locations:

  • N/NE: Grand Central Bakery 721 N Freemont
  • SE: TBA
  • SW: Food Front Co-op on SW Capitol Highway
  • NW: The Farm 13615 NW Howell Park Rd
  • Other locations to be announced

Please email us at csa@sauvieislandorganics.com and we will sign you up for this exciting new option.
Checks can be mailed to: SIO, 20233 NW Sauvie Island Rd. Portland, OR 97231
or Call the office 503-621-6921 to pay by Credit Card

*Several of our potato varieties will be coming from transitional acreage (acreage that we are now growing on organically but had been farmed conventionally within the past 3 years).

Sample Week

Quantity

Beets, Cylindra

3 pounds

Cabbage, January King

1 head

Carrots, Necoras

3 pounds

Kohlrabi, Gigante

1 each

Leeks, King Seig

6 each

Onions, Cortland

4 each

Parsnips, Gladiator

4 pounds

Potatoes, Yukon Gold

6 pounds

Raddichio, Leonardo

2 each

Winter Squash,

Nutter Butter

Butternut Squash

2 each

 

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